NATURAL WONDERS

  • Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

    As soon as you set eyes on the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, it will be obvious how the park got its name.
  • Grand Prismatic Spring

    Grand Prismatic Spring is an amazing hot spring full of color that illuminates its steam to blue and green as it rises from the surface of the water.
  • Grizzly Bear

    Photo by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
  • Mammoth Hot Springs

    Heat and water are hard at work building the travertine terraces up to 2 feet per year. The boardwalk will bring you up close and personal with thermal features that are currently.
  • Old Faithful Region

    Boardwalks guide you through thermal areas with impressive hot springs and geysers, while the Old Faithful Visitor Education Center will give you a better understanding of these magma-powered spectacles.

 


Your Yellowstone Vacation - Yellowstone National Park

     This is one of the fun parts of planning Your Yellowstone Vacation, and it will be hard not to get really excited while you're browsing through all of the natural wonders that await your arrival. To give you an idea of why planning your trip is important, we recommend at least 5 full days inside the park to allow enough time to see everything listed in the categories below. Anything less than that and you might have to pick and choose which features you want to see now, and which ones will have to wait until next time (once you visit the first time there usually is a "next time").

     Also included with some of the profiles below are estimated times that it will take to walk the boardwalks in the geyser basins and drive the scenic drives. Well, we won't keep you any longer, you have a vacation to plan. Enjoy!

Start planning your trip!


• Scenic DrivesYellowstone Wildlife          • Waterfalls          •

          • Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

 

Top Things To See In Yellowstone!

Old Faithful Geyser - Yellowstone National Park

1. Old Faithful Geyser

Old Faithful Geyser is probably one of the most, if not the most, famous geyser in the world and holds its place as a natural icon for Yellowstone National Park.  Crowds by the hundreds gather on the boardwalk around the geyser...Learn more!

 

Lower Falls and Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone - Yellowstone National Park

2. Lower Falls

The Lower Falls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is one of the biggest attractions in Yellowstone National Park.  After the Yellowstone River plummets over the Upper Falls, it flows for only about a half a mile before taking the 308 ft. plunge...Learn more!

 

Norris Geyser Basin - Yellowstone National Park

3. Norris Geyser Basin

Norris Geyser Basin is one of the most thermally active and diverse basins in Yellowstone.  Norris is comprised of two sections, the Back Basin and Porcelain Basin...Learn more!

 

 

Yellowstone Lake - Yellowstone National Park

4. Yellowstone Lake

Have you ever seen the largest alpine lake in North America?  Well, if you've seen Yellowstone Lake then the answer is "yes".  Yellowstone Lake is the biggest lake above 7,000 feet on the continent.  With shoreline geyser basins and...Learn more!

 

  Grand Prismatic Spring - Yellowstone National Park

5. Grand Prismatic Spring

Located at the heart of the Midway Geyser Basin, Grand Prismatic Spring is an amazing hot spring full of color that illuminates its steam to blue and green as it rises from the surface of the water.  As the 3rd largest hot spring in the world...Learn more!


 The Worlds Largest Map Store!


 

Mammoth Hot Springs - Yellowstone National Park

6. Mammoth Hot Springs

The Mammoth Hot Spring Terraces are constantly changing, so what you are seeing on your vacation today might not be what others saw last year, month, or even last week.  Heat and water are hard at work building the travertine terraces up to 2 feet per year...Learn more!

 

Gibbon Falls - Yellowstone National Park

7. Gibbon Falls

As one of Yellowstone's spectacular waterfalls that can be seen from the road, Gibbon Falls is the spot where the Gibbon River flows 84 feet over the erosion-resistant rock of the giant caldera rim...Learn more!

 

 Hayden Valley - Yellowstone National Park

8. Hayden Valley

The Grand Loop Road takes you through five miles of Hayden Valley, where sagebrush dominates the hillsides and large herds of bison roam wild across its expanse.  Hayden Valley is another favorite spot for wolf watchers to...Learn more!

 

Mud Volcano Boardwalk - Yellowstone National Park

9. Mud Volcano Area

This area offers some of the most unique thermal features in the park, like bubbling mud pots and lakes of acid.  The Mud Volcano Trail leads you by eerie and mysterious looking thermal features that have names to match, like Dragon's Mouth Spring, Churning Caldron...Learn more!

 

West Thumb Geyser Basin - Yellowstone National Park

10. West Thumb Geyser Basin

This is one of the most picturesque geyser basins in the park.  With Yellowstone Lake as its backdrop, West Thumb Geyser Basin is full of colorful thermal features.  This is also where the famous Fishing Cone Geyser is...Learn more!

 


Yellowstone Wildlife

Yellowstone is a very large and intact natural ecosystem that is home to hundreds of species of wildlife including grizzly and black bears, wolves, elk, bison, moose, bobcats, pronghorn, coyotes, and bald eagles to name a few. It is not a guarantee that you will see all of these animals, but there is a good chance that you will at least see some of them. It's all about being in the right place at the right time.

 

Grizzly Bear Elk Pronghorn Bighorn Sheep
Black Bear Bison Moose Bald Eagle
Grey Wolf Coyote Osprey Mule Deer

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Waterfalls

Rustic Falls - Yellowstone National Park

     There are hundreds of waterfalls in Yellowstone, many of which are in the backcountry and far from a trail. Lucky for you there are also several astonishing waterfalls displaying their grandeur along the main road, and others that only require a short hike to see. Most of the waterfalls mentioned here are great places to stop for a few moments to admire their beauty on your way to or from other major destinations around the park.

     Two of these waterfalls however, are worth planning your day around or at least making it a priority to see them. Those two waterfalls would be the Upper and Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River located within the yellow colored walls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. That's just a little pointer from us, it is your vacation nonetheless and we'll let you be the judge. Read more about the waterfalls listed below to help you decide just how many of these incredible waterfalls you want to see on your Yellowstone vacation.

Upper Falls Firehole Falls Moose Falls Virginia Cascade
Lower Falls Rustic Falls Kepler Cascades Undine Falls
Gibbon Falls Lewis Falls Tower Fall -

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 Scenic Drives

Blacktail Plateau Drive - Yellowstone National Park

     SHOTGUN!!! Driving through Yellowstone is inherently scenic the way it is, but there are other scenic drives that take you a little farther off the beaten path and back to places that can't be seen from the main road. A few of these scenic drives will lead you to a main attraction, and in some cases, the drive itself is the attraction.

     Drives like the Old Gardiner Road and Virginia Cascades Drive have some historical significance because they used to be sections of the main road, used by stagecoaches and early travelers. In any case, the slower pace and scenic ambiance alone will make the drive a welcomed treat. Oh, one more thing, make sure you still have those binoculars and cameras handy because that bear picture you've been waiting for could be just around the corner!

North Rim Drive Firehole Canyon Drive Firehole Lake Drive
South Rim Drive Virginia Cascade Drive Fountain Flat Drive
Blacktail Plateau Drive Old Gardiner Road Gull Point Drive
Upper Terrace Drive Chittenden Road -

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Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

Firehole Lake Drive - Yellowstone National Park

     Within the boundaries of Yellowstone there are over 10,000 different thermal features which is about half of all the thermal features in the world, and each one is different from the next. One of those thermal features is perhaps the most famous one in the world, Old Faithful Geyser, and the reason that most people come to visit Yellowstone. However, since Old Faithful is just one geyser, in the company of thousands of other thermal features, there are plenty to see.

     As you are walking through the geyser basins trying to appreciate and understand what you are looking at, remember that these thermal features are powered and heated by a large chamber of molten magma known as a "hot spot" not far under the ground from where you are standing. The four types of thermal features in Yellowstone are geysers, hot springs, mud pots, and fumaroles.

Old Faithful Geyser Fountain Paint Pots Roaring Mountain
Upper Geyser Basin Biscuit Basin Calcite Springs
Mammoth Hot Springs Black Sand Basin Artist's Paint Pots
Norris Geyser Basin West Thumb Geyser Basin Firehole Lake Drive
Midway Geyser Basin Mud Volcano Boardwalk Beryl Spring
Grand Prismatic Spring Sulpher Caldron Terrace Spring
Lonestar Geyser -  
     

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Thermal Area - Yellowstone National Park

Photo by Ethan Confer Photography

 


 

 

 


 

Grizzly Bear by Obsidian Creek

 


 

 Questions about planning your trip to Yellowstone?

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From the road near Mammoth Hot Springs

 

 


 

 Quaking Aspen Trees in fall

 


 

 Bull Elk in Mammoth Village

 


 

 Colorful Hot Spring

 


 

 West Thumb Geyser Basin

 


 

 Castle Geyser - Upper Geyser Basin

 


 

 Sunset in the Tetons

 


 

Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

 


 

 Elk Calf

 


 

Bison and Hot Spring

 


 

Geyser - Upper Geyser Basin

  


 

 Norris Geyser Basin 

 

Mammoth Hot Springs Region

Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

Mammoth Hot Springs
The Mammoth Hot Spring Terraces in the northern part of Yellowstone are constantly changing, so what you are seeing on your vacation today might not be what others saw last year, month, or even last week. Heat and water are hard at work building the travertine terraces up to 2 feet per year. The boardwalk will bring you up close and personal with...View More

Upper Terrace Drive
This popular 3/4 mile drive at the top of the Mammoth Terraces will take you back into the woods where you can see some impressive thermal features that are not visible from the main road. The beginning of the drive has a parking lot with access to the lower terrace boardwalk and offers an amazing view of...View More

Waterfalls

Undine Falls
Out of the hundreds of waterfalls in Yellowstone, only a handful of them can be seen from the road. Undine Falls is a section of Lava Creek that pours 60 feet over the edge of tough basaltic rock...View More

Rustic Falls
Rustic Falls is a 47 foot high plunge of Glen Creek just south of Mammoth Village. This fanning waterfall plummets into a ravine between reddish yellow rock walls just off to the side of the road...View More

Scenic Drives

Upper Terrace Drive
This popular 3/4 mile drive at the top of the Mammoth Terraces will take you back into the woods where you can see some impressive thermal features that are not visible from the main road. The beginning of the drive has a parking lot with access to the lower terrace boardwalk and offers an amazing view of...View More

Old Gardiner Road
The Old Gardiner Road is an old 5 mile gravel road that was orignally used as the main means of travel from Gardiner, MT to Mammoth Village in the early days of the park. Now that we have the paved North Entrance Road as our main travel way, the Old Gardiner Road is used as a scenic byway for visitors...View More

Blacktail Plateau Drive
This is a 6 mile one-way dirt road that takes you back into the woods and meadows of Blacktail Deer Plateau. Retreat from the paved road and experience the solitude of the Yellowstone wilderness...View More

Roadside Wonders

Forces of the Northern Range Self-Guiding Trail
This short 1/2 mile boardwalk located on the Blacktail Deer Plateau between Mammoth Village and Tower Junction will open your eyes and educate you about forces of nature that have sculpted the land before you. It will also teach you about the plants and wildlife alike that live in Yellowstone's Northern Range...View More

Boiling River Swimming Area
The boiling river is a small thermal river that flows into the Gardner River where visitors can soak and relax in a natural hot tub. A trail will lead you on an easy half mile walk along the Gardner River to a spot where you can access the soaking area...View More

Hoodoos
Enjoy a short drive through the Yellowstone Hoodoos. These massive boulders and columns of rock are pieces of Terrace Mountain that have fallen off over the years from hundreds of feet above...View More

Obsidian Cliff
Towering above the Grand Loop Road, Obsidian Cliff is a natural historic landmark and so is the small pavillion that contains information about the cliff's geological creation. The small pavillion that shelters the informational display about Obsidian Cliff is one of the oldest in the park, constructed in the 1930s...View More

Historic Fort Yellowstone Self-Guiding Trail
When the park was first being established and protected, the army set up shop in the area that is now Mammoth Village. Before the National Park Service was created, military personnel were sent to Yellowstone to protect it from vandalism, thieves, and poachers. Mammoth served as the ideal spot to...View More

Roosevelt Arch
The Roosevelt Arch has always been a symbolic gateway into Yellowstone National Park. This iconic symbol of Yellowstone's history was dedicated by President Theodore Roosevelt. An inscription at the top of the arch reads "For the benefit and enjoyment of the people" which helps us remember why Yellowstone was set aside...View More

45th Parallel
A large pullout about half way up the North Entrance road is a good place to stop for a picture at the 45th Parallel sign. The 45th Parallel marks the half way point between the North Pole and the Equator...View More

Wildlife

Grizzly Bear
Grizzly bears are on many people's wish list of things they hope to see while they are in Yellowstone. Grizzly bears are considered true hibernators and spend the winter months sleeping in their cozy dens waiting for spring's warmth to wake them up. After awaking in spring, the bears immediately begin looking for food to ease their hunger...View More

Black Bear
The black bear is 1 of 2 bears that can be found in Yellowstone, the other being the grizzly bear. Black bears are the smaller of the two and can range in color from black to brown to cinnamon colored. Because black bears can be different colors, this is not a reliable way to differentiate between them and grizzly bears. Some things to look for...View More

Bighorn Sheep
Bighorn sheep are one of the many ungulate species (hooved animals) that reside in Yellowstone. One thing that sets them apart from elk, deer, moose, and pronghorn is that they are very adapted to moving quickly and efficiently on steep rocky slopes. This adaptation gives them a great advantage when escaping predators...View More

Tower/Roosevelt Region

Waterfalls

Tower Fall
An easy 150 yard paved trail from the parking lot at the Tower General Store will get you to Tower Fall. Tower Fall is the point where Tower Creek drops 132 feet over a rocky ledge with some interesting and unique looking rock formations on the cliffs around it...View More

Roadside Wonders

Petrified Tree
Trying to fathom that something can be tens of millions of years old is hard to do. Well, that is how old the Petrified Tree is. This now solid rock was once a giant redwood tree surrounded by a forest of trees just like it. During violent volcanic eruptions millions of years ago, mudflows and volcanic deposits rapidly...View More

Lamar Valley
Referred to as America's Serengeti, Lamar Valley is teeming with wildlife in the summer months. This valley is a beatuiful expanse of open space where the Lamar River flows freely and is accompanied by impressive mountain peaks in the distance. Large herds of bison and elk roam here...View More

Calcite Springs Overlook
Yellowstone National Park is known for some of the amazing views that it offers. Calcite Springs Overlook is one of those views. An 800 ft. path will take you along the edge of a deep canyon where the Yellowstone River flows swiftly hundreds of feet below you. Mountain backdrops, unique cliff formations, and...View More

Wildlife

Grizzly Bear
Grizzly bears are on many people's wish list of things they hope to see while they are in Yellowstone. Grizzly bears are considered true hibernators and spend the winter months sleeping in their cozy dens waiting for spring's warmth to wake them up. After awaking in spring, the bears immediately begin looking for food to ease their hunger...View More

Black Bear
The black bear is 1 of 2 bears that can be found in Yellowstone, the other being the grizzly bear. Black bears are the smaller of the two and can range in color from black to brown to cinnamon colored. Because black bears can be different colors, this is not a reliable way to differentiate between them and grizzly bears. Some things to look for...View More

Grey Wolf
At one time, Yellowstone's wolves were completely erradicated from the park. In 1995, wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone after a long absence. Now, many different wolf packs have claimed their territory within Yellowstone and the surrounding National Forests. Thousands of visitors return to the park time and time again specifically for the wolves...View More

Pronghorn
This grassland ungulate is found mostly in the northern range of the park in areas with plenty of sagebrush like Lamar Valley, Blacktail Deer Plateau, and open spaces around the North Entrance. The pronghorn is one of North Americas fastest land animals, running at speeds up to 50 mph...View More

Norris Region

Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

Roaring Mountain
This hissing mountain of steam is the only thing like it in the park. Roaring Mountain is a barren hillside of thermal features called fumaroles. It got its name from the loud hissing and roaring that it makes due to thermal activity and could be heard miles away in the days of its discovery. Nowadays the roaring has quieted a bit but can still be heard if...View More

Artist's Paint Pots
The Artist's Paint Pots trail is so full of vibrant colors, comparable only to an artist's palette, it will be easy to see how they got their name. The short 1/3 mile trail begins at the parking lot just off the main road across from a wide open meadow. When the trail gets back to the paint pots, it climbs up a small hill to give you a birdseye view of the area and...View More

Norris Geyser Basin
Norris Geyser Basin is one of the most thermaly active and diverse geyser basins in Yellowstone. Norris is comprised of two sections, the Back Basin and Porcelain Basin...View More

Beryl Spring
Beryl Spring, pronounced "burl", is a popular attraction just off the road on your way to or from Norris Geyser Basin. The water in this thermal feature is extremely hot, with temperatures being above the boiling point. A small parking area just off the main road is a good place to stop to check out this beautiful...View More

Waterfalls

Virginia Cascade
Here, the Gibbon River turns into a 60 foot cascade of whitewater known as Virginia Cascade. The gently sloped Virginia Cascade will remind you of a natural waterslide as you admire its beauty...View More

Scenic Drives

Virginia Cascade Drive
Virginia Cascade Drive is a one way 2 1/2 mile road that spurs off of the main road between Norris and Canyon. About half way in you will come upon Virginia Cascade, a 60 foot cascade of the Gibbon River...View More

Wildlife

Coyote
Coyotes are commonly seen in Yellowstone near the roads and spotted hunting small mammals in fields and meadows. Coyotes primarily eat small rodents and mammals but will also feed on big carcasses if there aren't any wolves or bears around. Wolves and coyotes are natural enemies, and wolves, because they are much bigger than coyotes, will not hesitate to...View More

Madison Region

Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

Terrace Spring
Terrace Spring is a small grouping of thermal features just off the Norris/Madison road. As you are hastily traveling from one geyser basin to the next, Terrace Spring will help satisfy your thermal feature craving between major attractions. A short boardwalk...View More

Waterfalls

Gibbon Falls
As one of Yellowstone's spectacular waterfalls that can be seen from the road, Gibbon Falls is the spot where the Gibbon River flows 84 feet over the erosion-resistant rock of the giant caldera rim...View More

Firehole Falls
Take the Firehole Canyon Drive located just south of Madison Junction to get back to the falls. Pull outs and parking are available across from the falls. There is also more parking available further up the road...View More

Scenic Drives

Firehole Canyon Drive
The Firehole Canyon Drive is a hidden gem amongst the pine trees. This 2 mile one-way drive will take you through the beautiful canyon where the Firehole River flows, past Firehole Falls...View More

Wildlife

Elk
As a memeber of the deer family, elk are the most abundant large mammal in Yellowstone. While driving through the park, you will likely see elk quite often in the distance or near the road. In the spring, the elk begin making their way back to their nutritious summer grazing grounds within the park and female elk (cows) prepare to give birth to their elk calves around May and June. When the calves are born, they are extremely...View More

Old Faithful Region

Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

Midway Geyser Basin Boardwalk
The Midway Geyser Basin is an easy half mile boardwalk that takes you up close to some of Yellowstones biggest and most impressive thermal features. Excelsior Geyser is the first thermal feature you will come to. The beautiful blue and green water of Excelsior Geyser sits inside a 200 x 300 foot crater. This crater was formed by the large violent eruptions...View More

Biscuit Basin Self-Guiding Trail
Biscuit Basin is only a few miles north of Old Faithful Village on the Grand Loop Road. A 1/4 mile boardwalk will guide you through Biscuit Basin which got its name from the biscuit-like deposits that once surrounded the bright blue water of Sapphire Pool. In 1959, Sapphire Pool began erupting violently as a result of...View More

Black Sand Basin Self-Guiding Trail
Black Sand Basin is located less than one mile north of Old Fatihful Village on the Grand Loop Road. It sets at the base of a wall of rhyolite which was part of a lava flow during one of Yellowstone's volcanic eruptions and is the smallest of the geyser basin boardwalks in the Old Faithful area, with the boardwalk only being about 1/4 mile in length...View More

Fountain Paint Pot Self-Guiding Trail
The Fountain Paint Pot area is very active and displays all four types of thermal features that are found in Yellowstone. On your walk around this half-mile boardwalk you can encounter hotsprings, mudpots, geysers, and fumaroles. Only a few short minutes after you begin your walk, you will be at the Fountain Paint Pots (the area's name sake). The paint pots might be one of Yellowstone's weirdest and funniest thermal feautures. Plopping and bubbling as gasses escape the Earth...View More

Firehole Lake Drive
The one-way Firehole Lake Drive takes you through the woods and back to a place where hidden geysers and thermal features that can't be seen from the road, are found. Several pullouts and parking areas along your drive make it easy for you to get out of the car and take your time admiring these natural wonders. This is also where...View More

Upper Geyser Basin Self-Guiding Trail
The Upper Geyser Basin is the heart of Old Faithful Village. Home to the famous Old Faithful Geyser and the largest concentration of geysers in the world, the Upper Geyser Basin is a true spectacle of mother nature and part of what makes Yellowstone National Park such an amazing place to visit. Crowds by the hundreds gather in the summer months to witness...View More

Old Faithful Geyser
Old Faithful Geyser is probably one of the most, if not the most, famous geyser in the world where it holds its place as a natural icon for Yellowstone National Park. Crowds by the hundreds gather on the boardwalk around the geyser to witness the spectacular eruption of water that can blast up to 184 feet into the air...View More

Grand Prismatic Spring
Located at the heart of the Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone's Grand Prismatic Spring is an amazing hot spring full of color that illuminates its steam to blue and green as it rises from the surface of the water. As the 3rd largest hot spring in the world, Grand Prismatic measures approximately 220 x 300 feet and 120 feet deep...View More

Waterfalls

Lewis Falls
Lewis Falls is one of the first waterfalls you will see driving into the park through the South Entrance. The 30 foot falls can be seen by parking in one of the roadside pullouts nearby and walking onto the bridge that goes over the Lewis River...View More

Kepler Cascades
The Kepler Cascades flow rapidly through a rocky canyon just south of Old Faithful Village, drawing in crowds of visitors in a region mostly dominated by geysers and hot springs. With a height between...View More

Scenic Drives

Firehole Lake Drive
The one-way Firehole Lake Drive takes you through the woods and back to a place where hidden geysers and thermal features that can't be seen from the road, are found. Several pullouts and parking areas along your drive make it easy for you to get out of the car and take your time admiring these natural wonders. This is also where...View More

Fountain Flat Drive
Fountain Flat Drive is the access point for many different activites. At the front of the drive is the Nez Perce Picnic area, situated at the confluence of the Firehole River and Nez Perce Creek...View More

Wildlife

Osprey
The osprey is a bird of prey which feeds primarily on fish found in the rivers and lakes around Yellowstone. Since fish is their main food source, osprey live and build their nests near water. Nests are built high up on rock pinnacles like in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone or on top of dead trees...View More

Yellowstone Lake Region

Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

West Thumb Geyser Basin Self-Guiding Trail
This is one of the most picturesque geyser basins in the park. With Yellowstone Lake as its backdrop, West Thumb Geyser Basin is full of colorful thermal features. This is also where the famous Fishing Cone Geyser is. Fishing Cone Geyser was once a popular spot where early travelers would fish in the lake and promptly turn around and cook their catch...View More

Waterfalls

Moose Falls
Moose Falls is the first waterfall you will see when coming into the park from the South Entrance. Just a couple of miles from the entrance there will be a sign for Moose Falls and...View More

Scenic Drives

Gull Point Drive
This is a 2 mile two-way road that spurs off of the Grand Loop Road. On this drive there is a large picnic area amongst the shade trees with views overlooking Yellowstone Lake and the Lake Yellowstone Hotel...View More

Roadside Wonders

LeHardy's Rapids
LeHardy's Rapids is a part of the Yellowstone River where the river bed drops a little bit, throwing the water against large rocks creating turbulent white water. This is also considered to be the geological boundary of Yellowstone Lake. There are two pullouts from which you can access the rapids, both will get you to the rapids via a short trail or...View More

Yellowstone Lake
Yellowstone Lake is the largest alpine lake in North America which means Yellowstone Lake is the biggest lake above 7,000 feet on the continent. With shoreline geyser basins, under water thermal features, and 141 miles of shorline, this lake is truely one of a kind...View More

Wildlife

Moose
The moose is one of Yellowstone's largest mammals, standing up to 71/2 feet tall at the shoulder. Although they are not as commonly seen as other members of the deer family like elk and mule deer, moose have been spotted in the northern and southern parts of the park...View More

Canyon Region

Geyser Basins & Thermal Features

Sulpher Caldron
There is a small parking area on the east side of the road where you can park and walk up the sidewalk to view Sulphur Caldron and other...View More

Mud Volcano Self-Guiding Trail
The Mud Volcano area offers some of the most unique thermal features in Yellowstone, like bubbling mud pots and lakes of acid. The Mud Volcano Trail leads you by eerie and mysterious looking thermal features that have names to match, like Dragon's Mouth Spring, Churning Caldron...View More

Waterfalls

Upper Falls of the Yellowstone River
The Upper Falls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is visible from the South Rim Drive just south of Canyon Village. The flowing water of the Yellowstone River pours 109 ft. over the brink of the Upper Falls before making a 90 degree turn towards the Lower Falls just downstream...View More

Brink of the Upper Falls
There is a short road located between the North and South Rim Drives that takes you to a parking lot where you can get out of the car and walk a short distance to the brink of the 109 foot Upper Falls...View More

Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River
The Lower Falls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is one of the biggest attractions in Yellowstone National Park. After the Yellowstone River plummets over the Upper Falls, it flows for only about a half a mile before taking the 308 ft. plunge...View More

Scenic Drives

North Rim Drive
The North Rim Drive is a short one-way drive along the north rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. The North Rim Drive begins just south of Canyon Village on the Canyon/Lake road...View More

South Rim Drive
This short drive in the Canyon Area on the south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone offers spots where you can see both the Upper and Lower Falls. The Upper Falls can be seen from a viewpoint...View More

Chittenden Road up Mt. Washburn
This road spurs off of Dunraven Pass, the highest road in the park, and takes you even higher to a point where the views are priceless. The Chittenden Road is a two-way dirt road about a mile and a half long. There is a big parking area where the road stops, at which point you can continue the journey to the peak of Mt. Washburn...View More

Roadside Wonders

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone
Serving as the main attraction of the area, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone will impress anyone who sets eyes on it. Witness two awe-inspiring waterfalls within a half mile of one another flowing relentlessly through the yellowed canyon walls. The North and South Rim Drives will bring you right to the canyon's edge...View More

Hayden Valley
The Grand Loop Road takes you through five miles of Hayden Valley, a wildlife viewing hot spot in Yellowstone, where sagebrush dominates the hillsides and large herds of bison roam wild across its expanse. Hayden Valley is another favorite spot for wolf watchers to set up their spotting scopes in hopes to catch these amazing predators in action. Grizzly bears, coyotes and elk...View More

Wildlife

Bison
Once numbering in the millions around the United States, Yellowstone is home to the last remaining wild bison herds in North America. The bison is the largest land mammal on the continent. This will be apparent if a grown male (bull) bison happens to walk by your car while you're stopped at a pullout. This occurence is fairly common, especially...View More

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